ChrisWeigant.com

Friday Talking Points -- One-Third Of U.S. Economy Disappears

[ Posted Friday, July 31st, 2020 – 17:57 UTC ]

Let's all keep our eyes on the ball, shall we? The ball, in this case, being the fact that we just suffered the worst economic quarter ever. The gross domestic product dropped by 32.9 percent, or just shy (0.4 points) of one-third. This loss is three times bigger than the worst quarter ever previously measured. New unemployment claims were up again for the second week in a row, perhaps foreshadowing a "double-dip" recession, or even an actual depression.

So, of course, President Donald Trump decided to "win the news cycle" by floating the suggestion that he might just postpone the election:

The U.S. Commerce Department announced Thursday that despite trillions in emergency government spending, the economy shrunk a record 32.9 percent on a year-to-year basis between April and June. The devastating number is three times worse than any previous quarter, putting the U.S. economy on course to shrink more in 2020 than in 1932, at the depth of the [Great] Depression. The global economy was already facing its most severe recession since World War II. Within an hour of the news, President Trump called to delay the Nov. 3 U.S. election, citing, without evidence, the risk of massive voter fraud. Trump's suggestion was quickly rejected by most of his fellow Republicans.

That "within an hour" was generous, even. Others noted that Trump tweeted only sixteen minutes after the disastrous economic news was released. But again, let's not take his bait, at least for now.

Not only has the economy tanked by apocalyptic proportions, but several lifelines for those currently unemployed have now run out:

Already cutoff dates are coming and going. The federal ban on rental evictions expired Friday (though White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow promised it would be extended). The extra $600 a week in unemployment benefits under the Cares Act expire this coming Friday; the last checks have already gone out. And most small businesses that received loans under the Paycheck Protection Program have exhausted that money.

That was written earlier in the week, as "this coming Friday" is actually today. The $600 weekly benefit has now officially ended.

The coronavirus pandemic and the economic collapse have now focused the public on the absolute incompetence of the Republican Party writ large -- because it's not just limited to Donald Trump's vast shortcomings.

Nancy Pelosi's House passed a relief bill which would have avoided hitting all these deadlines, and she did so in the middle of May. Two and a half months ago, Democrats had already put their solution to the problem on the table. Mitch McConnell, at the time, said he wanted to "take a pause" rather than, you know, do his job. This pause ended two weeks ago, when McConnell emerged from his turtle shell to suddenly try to hammer together something his own Senate Republicans could vote on. This bill would never have passed the Democratic House (which McConnell was fully aware of), but he still wasted over a week finalizing it. He then refused to put it on the Senate floor for a vote, because he knew full well he didn't even have enough GOP votes to pass it.

Since McConnell put out his bill (one that President Trump called "semi-irrelevant"), McConnell has gone back to completely abdicating his duty once again. He washed his hands of the whole matter and let the White House minions duke it out with Pelosi and Chuck Schumer.

No wonder Mitch McConnell is in severe danger of losing his majority in the chamber.

The White House is desperate for a bill, but not desperate enough quite yet. We'll see what they do after a 24-hour news cycle that will headline the fact that the 600 bucks just ended for tens of millions of American families who have been receiving it.

So far, the White House has reportedly caved on the amount (they're now offering much shorter-term $600 weekly payments, as opposed to the $200 the Senate had proposed) as well as throwing in the towel on the concept of providing businesses with years of blanket immunity from lawsuits (a key Senate demand).

Nancy Pelosi has the upper hand here, obviously, because any attempt to paint her as the obstructionist dragging her feet is just flat-out laughable. Quick reminder: the Senate did absolutely nothing for two and a half months. All of this could have been negotiated and dickered over during that time period, but it didn't happen because Republicans were refusing to even admit that any bill was necessary. While the American economy shrank by one-third. So it's pretty easy to see who is going to win this blame game, especially since it is so patently obvious which side is fighting for the people and which side is playing Scrooge. Or perhaps Scrooge McDuck.

Which everyone is taking note of. After admitting that the Democratic plan "isn't perfect," a Washington Post columnist summed up the situation nicely:

But at least it's a plan; at least Democrats took a vote, while Republicans are stumbling around looking for their pants; and at least Democrats have accounted for economic reality, rather than parrot ideological "common sense" with all the accuracy of an anti-vaccination poster on Facebook.

So let's recap the past several weeks: Against the warnings of experts, states mostly led by Republicans begin to reopen. As COVID-19 cases start to surge, Republicans resisted reversing course, likely prompting another round of closings and possibly prolonging the associated depression. Now Americans who will face more time out of work thanks to those mistakes are also facing more time without government relief because that same party can't get its act together. It would be almost funny, if it weren't so sad.

One interesting commentary we've heard is that all the newfound enthusiasm on the Republican side for "being fiscally responsible" and "not adding to the deficit" is really an admission that they're about to lose big time in the 2020 election. With a new President Biden next year, the Republicans were always going to revert to form anyway (trying to deny Biden everything by sanctimoniously saying "we can't afford it," in other words). So why not start this effort now? But perhaps that's too cynical. Or optimistic -- take your choice.

What this all means is that when a bill is agreed to by the White House, it will pass the House because Nancy Pelosi will have gotten the lion's share of what she wanted. It will then pass the Senate with mostly Democratic votes, along with a handful of Republicans who are now terrified at their chances of being re-elected. We wrote about this earlier in the week in more detail. The only question is how long the White House minions keep the Kabuki show going before all of that happens. And already, they're showing serious cracks.

In a related story, the House has now passed 10 out of the 12 appropriations bills that are necessary to keep the government open past the end of September. Pelosi -- even in the midst of the current negotiations -- is putting McConnell to shame once again. The House Democrats are doing their job on the budget bills, so when October first looms guess whose fault it will be if things haven't been hammered out? The same Mitch McConnell who is guilty of wasting so much time now.

The other big political news of the week was the mourning of John Lewis. Three ex-presidents (Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, Barack Obama) gave eulogies. Neither Trump nor Vice President Mike Pence attended. Here's how Trump initially reacted:

It took 14 hours for Trump to tweet condolences after Lewis died on July 17 at the age of 80 from pancreatic cancer. In the interim, he posted dozens of tweets, including attacks on his opponent Joe Biden, his former national security adviser John Bolton and his niece Mary Trump. Then he golfed with Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.). By the time Trump put out a two-sentence tweet, with 23 words, all four living former presidents, plus Vice President Pence and dozens of lawmakers, had released statements of their own.

"Saddened to hear the news of civil rights hero John Lewis passing. Melania and I send our prayers to he [sic] and his family," Trump wrote.

Compare the president's terse tweet about Lewis, the last surviving member of the Big Six who organized the 1963 March on Washington, to his quick reaction this weekend after former Who Wants to be a Millionaire host Regis Philbin died at 88.

"One of the greats in the history of television, Regis Philbin has passed on to even greater airwaves," Trump wrote. "He was a fantastic person, and my friend. He kept telling me to run for President. Holds the record for 'most live television', and he did it well. Regis, we love you. And to Joy, his wonderful wife who he loved so much, my warmest condolences!!!"

Moving right along... there's a new Trump tell-all book out, and it's got a real doozy of a story in it:

Mar-a-Lago was bustling on the second night of President Donald Trump's Southern White House summit with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Feb. 11, 2017.... Dawn Basham, one of Trump's favorite lounge singers, was the evening's entertainment....

As Abe listened, Trump requested four songs and told Basham what a great job she was doing. Then the president asked Basham to twirl around for the men.... Almost precisely at mid-twirl, things began to change. A flurry of activity began at the president's table. Something had happened. Something with North Korea. Basham tried to make her exit. "Mr. President, I shouldn't know this," someone heard the performer say. Trump shrugged. "It's just nukes," the president said. "Sing us a song."

Because of course he did. It was also revealed this week that on Trump's recent phone call with his buddy Vladimir Putin, Trump didn't even bring up the bounties paid to the Taliban to kill American soldiers. Because of course he didn't.

It was also revealed this week that the Trump administration is going after journalists using tools that were supposed to be used to fight terrorists. No, really:

The Department of Homeland Security has compiled "intelligence reports" about the work of American journalists covering protests in Portland, Ore., in what current and former officials called an alarming use of a government system meant to share information about suspected terrorists and violent actors.

Over the past week, the department's Office of Intelligence and Analysis has disseminated three Open Source Intelligence Reports to federal law enforcement agencies and others, summarizing tweets written by two journalists -- a reporter for the New York Times and the editor in chief of the blog Lawfare -- and noting they had published leaked, unclassified documents about D.H.S. operations in Portland. The intelligence reports, obtained by The Washington Post, include written descriptions and images of the tweets and the number of times they had been liked or retweeted by others.

In pandemic news, Louie Gohmert -- one of those House Republicans that has been belittling face masks and pressuring his own staff not to wear them -- tested positive for COVID-19. He then astonishingly called together his staff and appeared in person to deliver the news to them -- showing a frightening disregard for their safety. Also, Herman Cain has now died from the coronavirus. He entered the hospital with severe symptoms a month ago, shortly after attending Trump's Tulsa rally (with no mask on).

Trump's poll numbers continue to tank, especially on his handling of the pandemic. He's now down to 32 percent approval on the subject, while 68 percent disapprove of his handling of the crisis.

Trump has apparently decided that the way to improve his re-election chances is to mentally go back to the gauzy 1950s. Here's his racist dog-whistle plea to (you just can't make this up) "The Suburban Housewives of America":

"I am happy to inform all of the people living their Suburban Lifestyle Dream that you will no longer be bothered or financially hurt by having low income housing built in your neighborhood," he wrote on Twitter. He was referring to his desire to repeal a fair housing rule -- signed into law in 1968 and strengthened under the Obama administration -- that was created to make sure federal funds didn't support discriminatory housing practices. But he was also continuing an imagined dialogue with a very specific group of voters:

"The Suburban Housewives of America must read this article," he'd tweeted the week before, linking to an opinion column bashing the housing rule. "Biden will destroy your neighborhood and your American Dream. I will preserve it, and make it even better!"

. . .

Trump, the only president for whom "unbridled capitalism" could refer to either an economic philosophy or a grammar lesson gone terribly wrong, was telegraphing multiple things with these phrases. One: that Suburban Housewives of America are the demographic that his advisers have told him he needs to wrestle back from Joe Biden to win the election. (In a recent NPR-PBS NewsHour-Marist poll, 66 percent of suburban women said they disapproved of the job Trump was doing overall.) Two: that he assumed this demographic would respond well to barely disguised racial fearmongering. Three: that his understanding of women voters is based on six reruns of Happy Days plus a vacuum cleaner ad from 1957.

In the "that's gotta hurt" category, we have two items: (1) Trump niece Mary Trump said she's going to do "everything in my power" to help elect Joe Biden. And: (2) the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Institute had to tell the Republican National Committee and the Trump campaign team to stop using St. Ronnie's image to raise money for Trump. Ouch!

Joe Biden, meanwhile, has been continuing to campaign, as he rolled out his final policy plan for his "Build Back Better" campaign agenda:

The plan calls for dedicating $30 billion of previously proposed spending on a small business opportunity fund for black, brown and Native American entrepreneurs.

Biden is also proposing to triple the goal for federal contracting with small disadvantaged businesses, from 5 percent to at least 15 percent of all spending on materials and services by 2025.

And he is calling for President Trump and Congress to create an emergency housing support program, along with promoting a refundable tax credit of up to $15,000 to help families purchase their first homes.

By the end of next week, we should also know who Biden's running mate will be (unless he slips the schedule again). So there's that to look forward to (and rampantly speculate about in the meantime).

OK, have we dealt with everything else in the news? Then here goes....

We end with the least-important news item of the week, because it was so unserious. Trump did indeed get lots and lots of political journalists to chase his shiny object of floating the idea of -- for the first time ever in American history -- postponing the election. He, of course, has zero power to do so, which is why it was so unserious. Trump himself was even walking it back by the end of the day, which wasn't too surprising when you consider how his fellow Republicans reacted:

Marco Rubio -- "He can suggest whatever he wants. The law is what it is. We're going to have an election that's legitimate, it's going to be credible, it's going to be the same as we've always done it. I wish he hadn't said that. But it's not going to change. We're going to have an election in November. And people should have confidence in it."

Chuck Grassley -- "It doesn't matter what one individual in this country says," Grassley said. "We still are a country based on the rule of law. And we must follow the law until either the Constitution is changed or until the law is changed."

Mitch McConnell -- "Never in the history of the country, through wars, depressions, and the Civil War have we ever not had a federally scheduled election on time, and we'll find a way to do that again this November 3."

Outside of Congress, other conservatives were just as scathing:

Many conservative thought leaders expressed alarm about Trump's suggestion to postpone the election. Steven Calabresi, a co-founder of the conservative Federalist Society that has helped the administration identify committed conservatives for judicial appointments, called Trump's tweet appalling and argued that it could be "grounds for the president's immediate impeachment" a second time. "Until recently, I had taken as political hyperbole the Democrats' assertion that President Trump is a fascist. But this latest tweet is fascistic," wrote Calabresi, a Northwestern University law professor, in an op-ed for the New York Times.

"Trump's suggestion to delay the election is the most anti-democratic thing any president ever said," writes conservative columnist Henry Olsen.

The Wall Street Journal's conservative editorial board says delaying the election is "a dreadful idea."

The real irony in all of this was pointed out in a Politico article:

"Mark my words, I think [President Donald Trump] is going to try to kick back the election somehow, come up with some rationale why it can't be held," former Vice President Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, said in April.

Trump rejected Biden's warning days later at a news briefing conducted by the White House coronavirus task force.

"I never even thought of changing the date of the election," he said. "Why would I do that? November 3rd. It's a good number. No, I look forward to that election."

Trump's reelection team was similarly dismissive at the time of Biden's remarks.

"Those are the incoherent, conspiracy theory ramblings of a lost candidate who is out of touch with reality," Tim Murtaugh, the Trump campaign's communications director, said in a statement.

Matt Wolking, the Trump campaign's deputy communications director, tweeted at the time: "Joe Biden's conspiracy theory is irresponsible and has no basis in reality."

That Murtaugh quote can be used verbatim to now describe President Donald Trump. You don't even need to change a single word.

From a different article on the same subject:

On Fox News that night, anchors and guests castigated and mocked Biden for the remarks, saying he was deranged and trying to instill fear in the electorate. "Someone might want to check up on Joe Biden during this lockdown -- he's saying some very strange things," said Mike Huckabee, the former Arkansas governor and former GOP presidential candidate, calling Biden's prediction "a bizarre conspiracy theory."

Well, Mike, now we know who is the presidential candidate "saying some very strange things," don't we? Might want to check up on Trump, as you suggested.

 

Most Impressive Democrat Of The Week

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi certainly has been impressive all week long, as has Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. But we're going to hold off on giving them more than Honorable Mention awards until we see the final plan.

Easily the most impressive Democrat this week was Barack Obama, who gave the best eulogy for John Lewis of any of the speakers at his funeral. Here's one review of Obama's remarks:

Obama ripped into "our federal government sending agents to use tear gas and batons against peaceful demonstrators." That's the sort of violence Lewis repeatedly braved. And it's the sort that was waged to clear a path for Trump's grand appeal to illiberal religious nationalism and to create the TV imagery of state violence against domestic dissent that is supposed to galvanize just enough reactionary sentiment among White voters to enable another counter-majoritarian electoral college inside straight.

Obama also tore into the voter suppression tactics targeting Democratic and minority voters still in operation today -- many put in place by GOP legislatures and egged on by Trump since. And Obama pilloried efforts to undermine the postal service "in the run-up to an election that's going to be dependent on mail-in ballots so people don't get sick."

Trump is already undermining vote-by-mail just about every day -- having unabashedly revealed that this is really about ensuring fewer people exercise their right to vote against Republicans, that is, against him.

"John Lewis devoted his time on this earth fighting the very attacks on democracy and what's best in America that we're seeing circulate right now," Obama said. "That's why John crossed that bridge. That's why he spilled his blood."

And Obama called for strengthened voting rights going forward, including a revitalized Voting Rights Act and the removal of all manner of barriers to participation.

That reference to interfering with the post office is an important one, if you haven't heard of it yet. A Washington Post article aptly titled: "Three presidents embrace the struggle for rights. Trump suggests postponing the election." also pointed out that Obama minced no words comparing what Lewis and so many others went through back in the Civil Rights Era with what was going on today:

Bull Connor may be gone. But today we witness with our own eyes police officers kneeling on the necks of Black Americans. George Wallace may be gone, but we can witness our federal government sending agents to use tear gas and batons against peaceful demonstrators.

Obama also called for the filibuster to be scrapped, since it has outlived any usefulness it may once have had. He also noted its use against the civil rights bills back in the 1960s.

For his stirring words spoken in the same church Martin Luther King Jr. used to preach in -- but mostly just for reminding Americans once again what the word "presidential" truly means -- Barack Obama is easily the Most Impressive Democrat Of The Week this week.

[President Barack Obama is now a private citizen, so you'll have to look up his contact information for yourselves if you'd like to let him know you appreciate his efforts.]

 

Most Disappointing Democrat Of The Week

We're going to give a group award to all the behind-the-scenes delegates to the Democratic National Convention who are not just having a disagreement right now, but are doing so in a very disappointing way:

A Democratic Party meeting that leaders hoped would project unity weeks ahead of the national convention instead broke out into a behind-the-scenes feud over corporate money in politics. At a virtual gathering of a key committee for the National Democratic Convention, Bernie Sanders-allied members said Joe Biden appointees called them "children" and made other rude comments in a breakout room where they were talking privately.

The argument served as a reminder of the tensions that are still simmering below the surface between moderate and progressives as the party seeks a united front against President Donald Trump. It also shows the limited power of Biden and Sanders, whose teams worked closely to hash out a deal on another plan under consideration by the committee with the goal of showing harmony.

"It was not only disturbing, but disrespectful," said Nina Turner, Sanders' former campaign co-chair who served on the committee. "Disgusting, disturbing, unacceptable. And it's no way to restore the faith of the people who already suspect the Democratic Party is unfair."

The pro-Bernie delegates weren't blameless in this either, as one was quoted saying something too scatological for us to repeat here.

Seriously, guys and gals, right now is the exact wrong time to have a playground fight with rude and insulting language. Disagree on the party platform all you want -- nobody's going to read it anyway, after all -- but please let's keep it civil, shall we?

The whole lot of them are hereby awarded the Most Disappointing Democrats Of The Week award. Hmmph.

 

Friday Talking Points

Volume 584 (7/31/20)

Once again, our talking points are all over the map. You know what a whole bunch of Americas are desperately hoping for? One single week -- just one single week -- that doesn't contain multiple constitutional crises within it. Hopefully, that week could come as soon as late January of next year.

 

1
   Stopping to smell the roses

Once again, so downright clueless as to hardly be believable.

"First Lady Melania Trump this week announced she'd be redesigning the White House Rose Garden. Because obviously, that's what most of America has been pining for over the past few months. 'Why oh why can't we have a more beautiful Rose Garden?' the public has demanded, since with so much peace and prosperity and calm the public is interested in nothing else. I'm sorry... was that too snarky? I don't believe it was, actually. After her announcement the hashtag #MarieAntoinette was trending on social media. The best tweet of all was far more snarky than I could ever come up with: 'Marie Antoinette would TOTALLY nod her head to Melania Trump's tone-deaf aloofness if she still had a head.'"

 

2
   Incoherent conspiracy theory ramblings (Part 1)

This is just too, too easy.

"Irony in the Trump White House is deader than a doornail. In this week's installment, China reacted to Donald Trump floating the idea of postponing our election by actually postponing Hong Kong's election. Pretty hard to take the high road on that one, but Kayleigh McEnany gave it the ol' college try. She denounced China for such an anti-democratic move without batting an eye. Earlier, of course, when Joe Biden had suggested that Trump might try to delay the election, his campaign communications director responded with scorn: 'Those are the incoherent, conspiracy theory ramblings of a lost candidate who is out of touch with reality.' No word yet on whether he's changing his tune now that Donald Trump is the one spouting such, quote, incoherent conspiracy theory ramblings, unquote."

 

3
   Incoherent conspiracy theory ramblings (Part 2)

Speaking of incoherent conspiracy theory ramblings....

"Donald Trump and his son Junior were both castigated by Twitter this week for posting a video of a deranged woman doctor rambling on about how there 'is already a cure' for the coronavirus [spoiler alert -- there isn't] and how masks are not medically useful for fighting the spread of the disease [spoiler alert -- they are]. This woman is a real wackadoodle, folks, who has stated her beliefs that gynecological problems and male impotence are caused by 'spirit husbands' and 'spirit wives' who have sex with people in their sleep. These demon incubi and succubae once walked the Earth in physical form, but drowned in Noah's flood. Oh, and that alien D.N.A. is being used in medicines and that government scientists are developing a vaccine to prevent religious faith. Now, one wackadoodle on YouTube wouldn't normally be a national news story, but when President Wackadoodle retweets her, it becomes one. Donald Trump is not just the 'reality TV president,' he's also the conspiracy-theorist-in-chief."

 

4
   Team Trump goes dark

Say what? Less than 100 days from an election?

"Days after it was reported that the Trump campaign has entirely pulled out of Michigan television markets, it was revealed that Team Trump had reportedly stopped spending any money on television ads anywhere in the country. That's right -- they've gone totally dark. They say it is because they are still getting used to the new campaign management (which was shaken up a few weeks back), but one wonders if they're actually on to something. After all, the more the public sees of Trump -- whether at rallies or giving his coronavirus briefings -- the more the public moves away from him and into the arms of Joe Biden. So maybe they're trying a new strategy: don't say anything about Trump at all, and maybe his poll numbers will go up? Hey, nothing else has worked, so perhaps this will do the trick. At this point, it couldn't hurt."

 

5
   Speaking of going dark...

Sadly, other Republicans have definitely picked up on Trump's barely-concealed racism in their own ads.

"Lindsey Graham hit a new low this week by releasing an ad against his opponent -- a Black man -- which takes a normal photo of him and darkens his skin and the background so much it's hard to even see the guy's face at all. Subtle, Lindsey... real subtle. His campaign called such accusations 'fake' and a 'non-story.' Jaime Harrison later emailed a message to his supporters pointing out that Graham 'is playing a part in a 400-year history of an Old South that had no room for people who looked like me. Our state is hurting right now, and we must keep our eye on the ball and fight for the people of the Palmetto State. Lindsey Graham might have darkened my face -- but it's Lindsey who the people of South Carolina can't recognize.' Which is an excellent way to put it."

 

6
   And how about some anti-Semitism?

Graham wasn't the only Republican senator caught blowing dog whistles this week, sadly.

"Jon Ossoff, who is Jewish, is running for David Perdue's Senate seat in Georgia. Purdue recently put out an attack ad featuring Ossoff and fellow Jew Chuck Schumer which declared that 'Democrats are trying to buy Georgia!' The photo of Ossoff had been manipulated to make his nose bigger and wider, just for good measure. This is the rankest of anti-Semitism, but apparently Perdue thinks that's what it'll take to hold onto his Senate seat. Surprising exactly no one, absolutely no other Republicans denounced the ad."

 

7
   Go Kris!

And finally, an amusing thing to hope for.

"Kansas will be holding its primary next Tuesday, and Democrats everywhere are watching with fascination to see if the state's voters nominate Kris Kobach for the Senate race there. Kobach winning the GOP nod would definitely put this Senate seat into contention, since Kobach recently lost a race for governor to a Democrat -- precisely because Kansas voters thought he was far too extreme to hold statewide office. If any other GOP candidate wins the primary, the Democrat won't have the slightest chance of victory in the general election, but if Kobach wins the nomination, we've got a solid shot at it. So I'd just like to personally say: 'Go, Kris!' and wish him the best of luck next Tuesday."

-- Chris Weigant

 

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Cross-posted at: Democratic Underground

 

217 Comments on “Friday Talking Points -- One-Third Of U.S. Economy Disappears”

  1. [1] 
    Chris Weigant wrote:

    Announcement -

    I just noticed when posting this that this is my 3,500th column. Woo hoo!

    :-)

    -CW

  2. [2] 
    Chris Weigant wrote:

    Second (technical) note -

    I initially posted this article as password-protected (finger slipped while cutting and pasting). I have removed the password, but noticed one odd thing already. So if there are any strange things about how your browser handles this column, let me know.

    Thanks.

    -CW

  3. [3] 
    goode trickle wrote:

    Great summation as usual.

    I was surprised you didn't go for the easy drive by of the fact that Trump, who had an empty schedule, called the press in for an impromptu photo op with the Taylor family at precisely the moment Obama started to deliver his eulogy.

  4. [4] 
    goode trickle wrote:

    Almost forgot.

    Congrats on the milestone.

  5. [5] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    let's not take his bait, at least for now.

    Now that the TV has told Bunker Boy that he can't delay the election, he wants to get on with it. "We're going to do very well in the election. Nobody wants that date more than me. I wish we would move it up, OK? Move it up."

    Sometimes I feel like maybe we shouldn't believe anything he says.

  6. [6] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    8 You don't have to live in Kentucky to vote against Mitch McConnell.

  7. [7] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    No wonder Mitch McConnell is in severe danger of losing his majority in the chamber.

    A lot of hillbillies are going to lose their $600 checks while Moscow Mitch is goofing off at work and taking vacations and long weekends. I thought he had better survival instincts than that. He is pretty unpopular and we did ditch Matt Bevin last November. Fingers crossed.

  8. [8] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    postponing the election. He, of course, has zero power to do so, which is why it was so unserious. Trump himself was even walking it back by the end of the day, which wasn't too surprising when you consider how his fellow Republicans reacted

    I suspect they'd be singing a different tune if Nancy wasn't standing in their way.

  9. [9] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    Yeah, Happy Happy 3500th!

    CW wrote,

    interesting commentary we've heard is that all the newfound enthusiasm on the Republican side for "being fiscally responsible" and "not adding to the deficit" is really an admission that they're about to lose big time in the 2020 election.

    And dollars to donuts the Repugs gain their sense of "Fiscal Responsibility" the moment it isn't a W or a Drumpf handing the "economic elites"** another windfall. They'll use the same game plan against Biden as they did against Obama, the last Democratic President elected to clean up after the Repugs. They'll obstruct until the cows come home to try to prove that "Government is broken" and America needs the GOP to "fix it "

    **Repug media frequently talks about "Liberal, Ivory Tower ELITES" who supposedly look down on regular Americans. I say, if you want to talk elites let's talk about the only elites that matters right now -- the economic elites who've benefitted from 40 years of Reaganism® along with Slick Willy's "triangulation" along with Obama's willingness to aim low in a misguided belief in "bipartisanship."

  10. [10] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    I would like to offer a brief remembrance of Herman Cain.

    America’s first minimum-wage law, passed by Congress in 1938, allowed states to set a lower wage for tipped workers, but it wasn’t until the ’60s that labor advocates persuaded Congress to adopt a federal tipped minimum wage that increased in tandem with the regular minimum wage. In 1996, former Godfather’s Pizza CEO Herman Cain, who was then head of the National Restaurant Association, helped convince a Republican-led Congress to decouple the two wages. The tipped minimum has been stuck at $2.13 ever since.

    https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2020/07/herman-cains-enduring-lobbying-triumph/

  11. [11] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    Seriously, guys and gals, right now is the exact wrong time to have a playground fight with rude and insulting language. Disagree on the party platform all you want -- nobody's going to read it anyway, after all -- but please let's keep it civil, shall we?

    Wow Chris. That yellow card has gone to your head!

  12. [12] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    This tweet just HAS to be memorialized in a stand alone comment box,

    The best tweet of all was far more snarky than I could ever come up with: 'Marie Antoinette would TOTALLY nod her head to Melania Trump's tone-deaf aloofness if she still had a head.'"

    Yep, gotta bow down to this level of Snarkness, yea verily.

  13. [13] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Chris,

    Wow! Three thousand, five hundred columns!? That must be some kind of world record. It makes my eyes sore just thinking about them all. :)

    Let's all keep our eyes on the ball, shall we? The ball, in this case, being the fact that we just suffered the worst economic quarter ever.

    Well, no kidding. It's called a lockdown in an epidemiological effort to control a dangerously infectious virus.

    This isn't an economic crisis. But, it will be if the health crisis isn't remedied and, fast.

    Keep focusing on the consequent economic downturn and the health crisis that caused it may never end.

    Not only has the economy tanked by apocalyptic proportions, but several lifelines for those currently unemployed have now run out

    Well, that is just an unbelievable disgrace. Especially knowing that all the fat cats are still getting their breaks. Talk about something else worthy of physically distanced and mask-covered protests in the streets!

    Democrats should be hammering home this blatant disparity at every opportunity, like in a talking point, hello?

    Oh, and my browser doesn't see anything strange about this column, at all. Heh.

  14. [14] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    From the Miami Herald Mar-a-Lago "It's just Nukes" story,

    After the press conference Trump stopped by the wedding, where he delivered an impromptu toast — “You really are a special, beautiful couple,” the president said — and then went back to the terrace to con­tinue mingling with his guests. Some members expressed their awe at how he handled the situation, even celebrating Trump’s apparent trans­parency with concerns of national security.

    “He chooses to be out on the terrace, with the members. It just shows that he’s a man of the people,” DeAgazio said to the Washington Post.

    "Man of the People?" As long as the People pay $200,000 to join Mar-a-Lago (plus $14,000 in monthly dues) I suppose.

    Why? Why are the Economist Elites (or "rich" for short) willing to pay that much? Are we "regular Americans" that loathsome to be around?

    Joe Lunch bucket Trumpanzie supporter doesn't get it that Trump doesn't even want to be in the same room as him.

  15. [15] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    From the POLITICO article

    Republicans race to head off Kansas Senate nightmare,

    It’s unclear precisely where the race stands at this point. Public polling has been sparse, and while most Republicans believe Marshall has a lead, the advertising flurry in the closing days may have scrambled things right as voters are paying closest attention. At least five outside groups and four campaigns will be running ads in the next week, according to Advertising Analytics.

    And there's at least one Democratic PAC doing what it can to help Kobach win the Primary. Go, Kris, indeed!

  16. [16] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    Yeah, and that "GOP goes dark" is a very very curious thing. I wonder if the literate members of the GOP know they're going to get Tsunamied (I just invented a word!) and are prepping for a post-Trump reality.

    "Hmmmmm," I say, "Hmmmmm!"

  17. [17] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    Tsunamied

    Tsunamied

    Tsunamied

    Tsunamied
    Tsunamied

    Tsunamied

    Tsunamied

    There. Have I repeated my "fake word" often enough that it's now a real word? I mean, that's how Repugs sell their lies -- just repeat it early and often enough ( "Trickle down"..."Swiftboat"... Benghazi"...) and it becomes True!

  18. [18] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    If Joe Biden were to commit to run a small donor only campaign in the general election it would go a long way toward creating unity in the party and bringing more people into the party.

    And it would be something he was actually doing to earn our votes instead of just making empty promises or as described in the article refusing to even make those empty promises.

    On the subject of conspiracy theories....

    Pelosi can pass all sorts of things and count on them not being passed or worked on in the Senate. Of course RepubliCons will lose because they know the deficits and/or a raise in taxes will need to happen.

    The is the Deathocrats job to make people think it is being done equally when it isn't.

    Then the Republicons can take over again after the crisis because the Deathocrats raised taxes and/or ran up a deficit and propose tax cuts for the wealthy as a solution.

    All we need is ANOTHER forty years or so of this pattern repeating itself and then we can start considering whether this theory might actually be accurate.

  19. [19] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    Mtn Caddy-
    Lies like candidates that take big money don't feel any obligation or do anything to benefit their big money contributors?

    I like the word I invented better- Deathocrats.

  20. [20] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    And here's another to go with what you will get form the Deathocrats:

    Screwnamied!

  21. [21] 
    Chris Weigant wrote:

    goode trickle [3] -

    See my comment at the start of the talking points. You wouldn't believe how much stuff winds up on my own cutting floor each week... stuff that normally would have been a weeks-long DC story...

    Please, for the love of all that's holy, bring back a little boredom to politics...

    Sigh.

    John From Censornati [7] -

    One can only hope. Isn't Mitch the secondmost hated (by his own constitutents) member of the Senate now, only behind (or "above," I guess) Susan Collins?

    JFC [10] -

    I did not know that. I mean, I knew about the tipped wages part but not that he had anything to do about it. He's even worse than I thought! Uzbecki-becki-becki-stan-stan indeed!

    [11] -

    Yeah, well, it's been a kindergarten monitor kind of week... sigh...

    MtnCaddy [12] -

    I know, right? I laughed out loud when I read it, and then when I found it again putting together today's column, I laughed out loud again.

    "Let them eat pie."
    (something was lost in the translation...)

    Also, I kind of like "tusnamied." Nice verbification, there. Well done!

    :-)

    3,500 columns... I need a beer...

    -CW

  22. [22] 
    Chris Weigant wrote:

    LizM -

    Looks like Biden's already slipped his veep-naming schedule. Probably the vetting process has slowed down due to the pandemic, that's my guess. He really has no reason to announce before the convention, where these things are traditionally unveiled...

    -CW

  23. [23] 
    Chris Weigant wrote:

    One thing that didn't make it in the column -- we may (hurricane-depending) see the first "splashdown" re-entry event since 1975 this weekend, as the SpaceX crew returns to Earth.

    Pretty cool, I gotta admit...

    -CW

  24. [24] 
    andygaus wrote:

    Supposedly nothing dislodges true Trump supporters, but I wonder. If large numbers of people are suddenly sleeping in their car and eating out of garbage cans, will they accept the explanation that "it's all China's fault"?

  25. [25] 
    ListenWhenYouHear wrote:

    CW,

    Congrats on hitting # 3,500!!! I look forward to reading the next 3,500!

    In pandemic news, Louie Gohmert -- one of those House Republicans that has been belittling face masks and pressuring his own staff not to wear them -- tested positive for COVID-19. He then astonishingly called together his staff and appeared in person to deliver the news to them -- showing a frightening disregard for their safety. Also, Herman Cain has now died from the coronavirus. He entered the hospital with severe symptoms a month ago, shortly after attending Trump's Tulsa rally (with no mask on).

    I am not sure if you know this, but Gohmert did not announce to his staff that he had tested positive for COVID-19 until AFTER a story announcing it was published in Politico. Not sure when — or even IF — Louie was going to tell his staff, but a few of them thanked the journalist who broke the story for letting them know he was infected.

  26. [26] 
    Chris Weigant wrote:

    ListenWhenYouHear [25] -

    Hadn't heard that, but did read a Politico article that said their reporters are getting SWAMPED with complaints from all the Capitol Hill staffers who are being used as cannon fodder in the GOP "nothing to see here... move along" ignore-it-and-it'll-go-away strategy. And they're not happy, to put it mildly...

    -CW

  27. [27] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Didn't Biden promise an announcement by the first week of August?

    Well, it can't come soon enough for me.

  28. [28] 
    Chris Weigant wrote:

    LizM -

    He's now apparently saying "the week of August 10"...

    -CW

  29. [29] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    And, by the way, face masks will not be the saving grace for America.

    Face coverings will only work to control the virus if that measure is part of an overall comprehensive package of measures to combat COVID-19, including strengthening the public health architecture so that testing and contact tracing form the central focus of an effective response, along with physical distancing, hand hygiene, respiratory hygiene and as close to 100% buy-in by the public at large so that everyone takes their own responsibility to do all they can to break the chains of transmission.

  30. [30] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Chris,

    Good God ... I can't believe that he doesn't already know who he'll announce ... just get the bloody thing over with already!

  31. [31] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    The longer he waits, the more worried I am.

  32. [32] 
    Chris Weigant wrote:

    LizM -

    Relax. He probably does know. He's just waiting for all the vetting to come in, that's all.

    :-)

    -CW

  33. [33] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Relax? Me? I'm relaxed! I'm always relaxed. Why wouldn't I be relaxed!?

  34. [34] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    CW-
    see comment 51 FPC, A National Day of Mourning.

    It concerns the discussion you started to participate in but never finished. In the start of the discussion you based your argument on false information and did not pr5ovide sufficient response when I pointed out the false information and the flaws in your argument.

    You are not getting off the hook that easy.

    Man-up and have a COMPLETE DISCUSSION.

    Your strategy of making arguments and dubious conclusions based on false information and then ignoring when I point it out in a response is worse than using foul language.

    If that kind of behavior is going to be allowed then banning foul language is really a pointless exercise in futility as the foul language ban is not addressing the real problem with the comments here.

    Be part of the solution- not part of the problem.

  35. [35] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    I have been commenting here for over 1000 of your columns and am still waiting for you to have a complete discussion on this.

    What is the delay? Are you not able or just not willing to have a complete discussion?

  36. [36] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    You want a complete discussion? I'll give ya a complete discussion! Where do you want it!?

  37. [37] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    After all, if one third of our economy disappearing is worthy of discussion then losing 100% of our democracy and a possible solution should also be worthy of discussion.

    You don't really want to be the enemy of the possible good because it is not perfect in your mind when the not perfect in your mind is based on false information and dubious conclusions- do you?.

  38. [38] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    Liz-
    Where do I want it?

    In an article. But here in the comments would be a good start and better than nowhere.

  39. [39] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    Maybe I should just relax and wait for CW to get around to it like waiting for Biden to announce his VP pick.

    The destruction of our democracy and country isn't really a pressing issue, after all.

  40. [40] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    As this is how your promoting the Deathocrats deception affects democracy, I submit the following song on behalf of democracy:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iXTPaLf_lvE

  41. [41] 
    TheStig wrote:

    CW-Congratulations on your 3500th column! My morning coffee ritual wouldn't be the same without you.

  42. [42] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    Here's one that describes the relationship between the Deathcrats and the big money interests:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZYJ8yf0w2E

  43. [43] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    How prophetic is the line "The hours I spent wiping it off my hired DJ when you think of the current hired DJ (D.J. Trump). :D

  44. [44] 
    John M from Ct. wrote:

    John from Censornati, your [5]:

    "Sometimes I feel like maybe we shouldn't believe anything he says."

    Sometimes?

    When was the last time the president said anything that wasn't a lie or a demented ramble? I hope you haven't been believing him at times, as if he had some fraction of sincerity that he occasionally indulges.

    As to the Talking Points, congratulations to Chris on such a productive column. I agree that a very large part of Biden's overwhelming lead in the polls, this far out from the election, is that expression of a national desire to just ... turn ... him ... off.

  45. [45] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    Premature, perhaps, but here's one for my fellow Weigantians,

    Sharkey's Day - Laurie Anderson.

    It's too damn early on the Left Coast, so I'm going back to sleep.

  46. [46] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    Here's one for the confederate statue issue:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5_teUu9jMc

  47. [47] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Hey, Don, pleasant dreams ...

  48. [48] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    John M from Ct [44],

    Just a little snark.

  49. [49] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    Natasha’s rose garden stunt really appears to me as if it’s just a lame attempt to steal Big Money Joe’s thunder. Shameless as she is, I guess she thought it would be too transparent to steal our Let Them Eat Cake slogan. Why does she care about the White House anyway? Doesn’t she live in Maryland with her chain migrant parents and the autistic kid?

    I really don’t care if she tells the help to plant new flowers, do u? Be best!

  50. [50] 
    Kick wrote:

    Chris Weigant

    I just noticed when posting this that this is my 3,500th column.
    Woo hoo!

    94 bottles of beer on the wall
    Instead of taking one, down them all
    Congratulations, CW!

    93 DAYS * 15 HOURS * 32 MINUTES

  51. [51] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    John,

    When was the last time the president said anything that wasn't a lie or a demented ramble? I hope you haven't been believing him at times, as if he had some fraction of sincerity that he occasionally indulges.

    It happens.

    In fact, it happened just the other day, you know, when he said the COVID thing is going to get worse before it gets better. Not sure if he believes it, though, or if he has any idea about just how worse.

    "It's always darkest before it's completely black."

  52. [52] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    Tucker Carlson's white power program on Trump TV, which until very recently had a head writer who got cancelled for also writing the same racist hate speech anonymously on the internets, is obviously hurting for talent. The best the new racist writer guy has come up with so far has been to call Tony Fauci "Dear Leader". Not even racist. Just stupid.

    Fauci is "a hypocritical buffoon who refuses to admit what he clearly doesn't know. If you say that out loud, they will cancel you." Tucker said out loud on TV. (I do wonder if that last part was actually some kind of warning note to Tucker and maybe he was too dense to realize it.)

    Don't get caught outside without a mask. Fauci's secret police will be violently enforcing his executive orders at Applebee's and Wal*Mart.

  53. [53] 
    Kick wrote:

    andygaus
    24

    Supposedly nothing dislodges true Trump supporters, but I wonder. If large numbers of people are suddenly sleeping in their car and eating out of garbage cans, will they accept the explanation that "it's all China's fault"?

    Good point. And if anyone out there was under the mistaken impression that Donald Trump was going to be "their voice," there are decades of history of Trump's "concern" for people. He doesn't care:

    "He Lives Like a Pig" ~ Donald Trump

    Donald should travel around America and take a good look at it because it resembles this family he's disparaging and has been terrorizing for multiple years. He's been lying about them and bullying them for over a decade, attempting to force them off their property.

    Trump doesn't care:

    Donald Trump’s Golf Resort Gone Awry

  54. [54] 
    Kick wrote:

    Elizabeth Miller
    29

    And, by the way, face masks will not be the saving grace for America.

    Unfortunately, EM, many in the Trump cult in Texas and the surrounding states won't even wear the masks. Trump has politicized the issue and made it about himself, and at this point, it's firmly baked in. The cult's "Dear Leader" said it was a "hoax" and the gullible believe him and continue to claim that there's "nothing to it"... right up until they walk into the ER and are admitted to the hospital, many of them too far gone to recover. Some that recover will have health issues that will remain for the rest of their lives.

    Sadly, it appears the damage that Trump has done regarding the coronavirus is irreversible at this point. I wonder how many more deaths it will take to convince them.

  55. [55] 
    nypoet22 wrote:

    If large numbers of people are suddenly sleeping in their car and eating out of garbage cans, will they accept the explanation that "it's all China's fault"?

    no, they'd have to be fed a scapegoat who is much closer to home. someone whose books they can burn, and whose shop windows they can break. never for a second doubt the ability of human beings to blame others for their misfortune.

    JL

  56. [56] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    It's really too bad that Trump will be in charge for at least another six months. That's too long when it comes to getting the virus under control.

    So, what are the Democrats doing to control the virus, now!?

    There is no shortage of things they could be doing, bypassing the presidents ineptitude.

  57. [57] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    [6] John From Censornati wrote:

    8 You don't have to live in Kentucky to vote against Mitch McConnell.

    I'm game. What can I do to help defeat #MoscowMitch?

  58. [58] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    [31]

    Elizabeth Miller wrote:


    The longer he waits, the more worried I am.

    Relax, Gurlfriend! What's the "worry" because Joe won't "hurry?"

    I'm thrilled that Joe is taking his sweet time. I suspect that Joe moving the VP announcement day back is to:

    (1) Allow the media to keep it's focus on Trump flailing about, our tanking economy & 150,000+ Americans dead of the Trump virus.

    (2) Allow the media to meanwhile get "curiouser and curiouser" about who Joe will pick. I hope he puts off the announcement of his VP choice until the convention. Think about it: the moment Joe announces his VP choice/future of the Democratic Party the MSM and Faux News/OAN/Breitbart media will decend upon and assail that choice. I say, let America baste in Trump Suckiness a while longer.

  59. [59] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    [56]

    Elizabeth Miller wrote:


    It's really too bad that Trump will be in charge for at least another six months. That's too long when it comes to getting the virus under control.

    So, what are the Democrats doing to control the virus, now!?

    There is no shortage of things they could be doing, bypassing the president's ineptitude.

    Really? Like what? Please be specific.

  60. [60] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    MtnCaddy,

    What can I do to help defeat #MoscowMitch?

    To vote against him, you'll have to live in CO, IA, ME, AZ, MT, KS, NC, AL, or GA. Or you'll have to cheat, but Big Orange says it's easy.

    Otherwise, there is always the option to donate some Big Money even if it goes to those failing losers at the Lincoln Project. They're targeting the senate too.

  61. [61] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    LizM,

    So, what are the Democrats doing to control the virus, now!?

    Which Dems? Big Money Joe?

    There is no shortage of things they could be doing, bypassing the presidents ineptitude.

    I think they should start with not packing church pews for big funerals, masks or not. It kind of dilutes their lead by example criticism of Dear Leader.

  62. [62] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    [60]

    John From Censornati wrote:


    MtnCaddy,

    Otherwise, there is always the
    option to donate some Big Money even if it goes to those failing losers at the Lincoln Project. They're targeting the senate too.

    Dunno why you regard the Lincoln Project as "failing losers." They're ads are just KILLER and again, makes me hope that CW writes about why LP/Repugs seems better at political ads than the Dems. Maybe it's because the Repugs are the "Daddy Party" while the Dems are the "Mommy Party."

  63. [63] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    MtnCaddy [62],

    Just a snarky little Trumpism.

  64. [64] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    JFC has been here forever but, nobody knows who he is. Hello?

  65. [65] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    JFC,

    I think they should start with not packing church pews for big funerals, masks or not. It kind of dilutes their lead by example criticism of Dear Leader.

    Well, there is definitely that. :(

    Which Dems? Big Money Joe?

    Of course, Big Money Joe, but I was thinking Dems, just in general.

  66. [66] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    MtnCaddy,

    Really? Like what? Please be specific.

    Now, that right there is a failure of imagination. Seriously, I believe I was the one asking the question. :)

    Oh, and thanks for the apostrophe!

  67. [67] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Relax, Gurlfriend! What's the "worry" because Joe won't "hurry?"

    Well, I worry. That's what I do.

  68. [68] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    I was thinking Dems, just in general.

    The governor here in KY is rowing hard against the GOP
    tide of deliberate disease distribution.

  69. [69] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    Country Club Don twittered while taking a break from cheating on the golf course this afternoon.

    Payroll Tax Cut plus Dollars! is the sum total of his quack. It's unclear exactly what this cryptic message might mean to the death cult's faithful zombies, but I think it might be something roughly equal to Demon Semen plus Hydroxy!

  70. [70] 
    Kick wrote:

    Elizabeth Miller
    56

    It's really too bad that Trump will be in charge for at least another six months. That's too long when it comes to getting the virus under control.

    Yes, ma'am.

    So, what are the Democrats doing to control the virus, now!?

    There is no shortage of things they could be doing, bypassing the presidents ineptitude.

    There is no shortage? Uhhhhh. What do you think the Democrats can do to get the Trump cultists to stop downplaying the disease and put on their masks and practice social distancing? It's like 2/3 of the people in the country are working to put out the fires while the other 1/3 are running around with lit matches.

  71. [71] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Did I say it would be easy?

  72. [72] 
    chaszzzbrown wrote:

    [45] MtnCaddy

    Sharkey says:
    I turn around - it's fear
    I turn around again - and it's love
    Nobody knows me
    Nobody knows my name

    Wow, totally forgot about this gem. The full ~8 minute "Mr. Heartbreak" album version also on YouTube is also worth a listen.

    Thanks!

  73. [73] 
    TheStig wrote:

    JFC-52

    I've been seeing close to 100% masks at the grocery for about a week. Don't know about Fauci, but the local spike in COVID cases seems to be a powerful persuader.

  74. [74] 
    TheStig wrote:

    Herman Cain is a shoe in for a Darwin Award. Cain talked the talk and walked the plank for Trump. Did the White House send a ham to his widow?

  75. [75] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    The Guardian profiled The Lincoln Project on Saturday.

    I like their ads, but are they effective? They're definitely good at trolling the failing orange Twitter troll. That's a good thing right up until he starts a nukular war or something really awful.

    I'm unconvinced that they move death cult voters. On the other hand, they seem like they should work really well against GOP senate candidates.

  76. [76] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    We're all on the coronavirus cruiseship now and nobody wants to let us off, but Kuwait just banned travel from 31 countries and USA was not one of them! So, if you get tired of Bunker Boy throwing paper towels at us, you can always opt for an exotic holiday in the sun.

  77. [77] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    MtnCaddy [16],

    that "GOP goes dark" is a very very curious thing

    For sure. I'm not sure how it gets any darker than deliberately spreading a lethal disease.

  78. [78] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    TS,

    I've been seeing close to 100% masks at the grocery for about a week.

    I'm not sure how helpful that will be in reducing transmission.

    Wearing masks when physical distancing is a challenge doesn't work to stop the virus unless it is part of an overall comprehensive package of measures and strategy to fight the virus and get it under control.

    The US does not have that comprehensive package of measures and strategy and, clearly, one isn't coming before the election and, perhaps, maybe not after, either.

    It is hard to watch.

  79. [79] 
    TheStig wrote:

    EM - I agree. Masks are only marginally effective. They slow the rate of transmission and buy time. That is helpful.

    The biggest failure of the US health system is a lack of rapid turnaround testing combined with comprehensive contact tracing and mandatory quarantine as needed. We used to know how to do this public health drill when necessary. It fell out of fashion.

    I'm not putting a lot of faith in a COVID vaccine. COVID is closely related to the common colds, and we've never been able to develop a practical cold vaccine. IF, and it's a big IF, even if we develop working vaccines, they may only work about as well a flu vaccines....which is not all that well.

    It is hard to watch.

  80. [80] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Yeah, vaccines probably won't be our saving grace, either.

    The idea that an effective and safe vaccine is coming soon seems like it is overriding any effort to improve health systems and the public health architecture that will actually be necessary to stop the virus.

    Your guy in charge of testing - Admiral Giroir(sp?) was asked the other day about contact tracing and testing and his answer was to pull out his mask and, while waving it in the air, say that the mask is what is most important in this fight against COVID-19. It was jaw-dropping.

    Do you think a national lockdown or regional lockdowns are going to be needed, even for just a relatively short period of time to bring the number of cases substantially down, in order for the US to get on the right track, assuming that the lockdown time will be used to stand up a competent strategy for testing/isolation/contact tracing/quarantining contacts?

    Could a high enough percentage of the American people be persuaded to buy into this sort of action?

    Will any of this only be possible if Biden wins the election? Six months is such a long time to wait!

  81. [81] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    Will any of this only be possible if Biden wins the election?

    Yes.

    It will only be possible- it is unlikely it will happen. :(

    "Six months is such a long time to wait."

    And yet we have been waiting for decades for the Deathocrats to get the big money out of our political process which is the main reason that our government is unable to properly deal the the pandemic now.

    That is why the only proper way to refer to them is as the Deathocrats.

    "Any of this" would be much more possible if we elected a small donor only Biden than if we elect the big money Biden we are being offered.

    And if Biden was the leader we need he would recognize that and do it.

    And if citizens really want a Biden that will do what we need then they will tell Biden that if he wants their votes he has show true leadership and run a small donor only campaign.

  82. [82] 
    Kick wrote:

    Elizabeth Miller
    71

    Did I say it would be easy?

    No, you didn't, but you said there was no shortage of things Democrats could do, and I'm explaining that there are certain parts of the country where you're not going to be able to fix the Trumpian proliferation of "stupid"... the misinformation and coronavirus denial that Donald Trump is still spewing is already baked in.

  83. [83] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    And yet we have been waiting for decades for the Deathocrats to get the big money out of our political process which is the main reason that our government is unable to properly deal the the pandemic now.

    I think Big Money Joe will prove you wrong on that score.

    Sure, big money in politics is a root cause of slow progress on any number of issues. But, strong and competent leadership is the main missing ingredient in the US response to COVID-19.

  84. [84] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    A strong and competent leader would not take big money to run their campaign. When you vote for big money candidates you are not voting for strong and competent leadership so of course if we were to get strong competent leadership by voting for big money Biden it would certainly be a surprise because it has never happened before.

    Funny, that's one of the arguments often used against One Demand- it has never happened before.

    Yet no one other me says that a big money candidate acting as a strong competent leader has never happened before when you say that Biden will.

  85. [85] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Kick,

    Maybe this novel coronavirus is just the thing to begin to reverse the proliferation of and baked-in "stupid" as the spread of COVID-19 reaches people in certain parts of the country, directly or otherwise, and they begin to understand who has their back and who doesn't.

    And, maybe the only thing to do is GOTV and everything else is just distraction.

    I just don't want to see things get much worse for my American friends, you know ...

  86. [86] 
    Kick wrote:

    John From Censornati
    68

    The governor here in KY is rowing hard against the GOP
    tide of deliberate disease distribution.

    Well, that's a tough row to hoe. Meanwhile, over in Texas, our governor couldn't organize a pissing contest in a brewery, but he got himself an invite to the White House and was first in line over the Trump cliff... and here we are now.

  87. [87] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    Jesse Watters, Billo The Clown’s half-wit understudy, appeared on Trump TV’s The Five back in March and said that the virus could be beaten with the power of positive thinking and America needs to wake up to that. He minimized the oncoming plague (Nine people have died. That is tragic, but that is teeny). He offered tips for avoiding the Tump Virus ( Don’t get sneezed on and cancel your trips to infected countries). Ultimately, he stated that This is the best country in the world to get coronavirus (because they'd shoot you in North Korea if you did).

    Now, five months later, we’ve proven that we are indeed the best at coronavirus. We’re Number One.

    Nobody should ever forget that Fat Donny and Trump TV have a symbiotic relationship. They deserve a great deal of blame for our current situation. They should never be taken seriously and Democrats should not appear on the network and lend it credibility. Never.

  88. [88] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Welcome, everyone, to another CW Sunday Night Music Festival and Dance Party!

    And, the really good news is that I have eliminated all of my speaker issues. I think it's called a HDMI cable and I'm lovin' it!

    So, what d'yall say we get this dance party off to a rip roarin' start with a little Saturday Night Fever tune ...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YxvBPH4sArQ

  89. [89] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Come on, everybody ...shake, shake, shake ... shake, shake, shake ... shake your booty!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l3fZuW-aJsg

  90. [90] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    Okeley Dokely,

    Here's a contribution from The Talking Heads.

  91. [91] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    And here's one of my fave Marvin Gaye tunes, Trouble Man tunes.

    And... Got to give it up

  92. [92] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:
  93. [93] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    I'm in the mood for stoner tunes.

    Three cheers for the Guru Maharaj Ji!

  94. [94] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    You're always in the mood for stoner tunes! Heh.

  95. [95] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Hey MtnCaddy, love love love Trouble Man (soundtrack)...

    ... when you've been frozen in time for seventy years, it'll bring you up to speed!

    So, I'll put it on the list.

    On your left!

  96. [96] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    JFC, do you like Jimi Hendrix?

  97. [97] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    As stoner songs go, I like this, of course ...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZeMlQEWEg2Q

  98. [98] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    I'm not a big fan of 60's music. I'm more Generation Jones.

  99. [99] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    I suppose I am, too but, I do like a lot of the 60's music.

  100. [100] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    we were too young to be hippies
    missed out on the love
    turned to a teen in the late 70's
    in the Summer of Drugs

  101. [101] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    Yeah, well, I'm 61. I started listening to pop music around 1969. I still have ~150 45-RPM "singles".

    Rather than complete my undergraduate degree I proceeded directly to "establishing a shady reputation."

    By hanging out with various rogues, slackers and ne'er-do-wells, many of them younger than I, I was exposed to tons of more contemporary music. Eventually I concluded that they didn't stop writing good music in 1979.

    Take, for example Swing On This by Alice in Chains (one of my all-time fave names of a band.

  102. [102] 
    ListenWhenYouHear wrote:

    Don Harris

    A strong and competent leader would not take big money to run their campaign.

    Why not? Are you saying that if someone wanted to donate $10,000 to help get OneDemand off the ground and running, you would not accept the gift because you would then be beholden to the donor’s wishes? Your inability to accept the donation gracefully without assigning corrupt intentions to the giver says a helluva lot more about the person you are than anyone else! Or are you saying that you would be able to resist being “bought” by a large donation, but no one else is able to? I also love that you claim to know the heart and intentions of anyone who would give a donation simply by the amount they give!

    No, strong and competent leaders ARE more than capable of accepting large donations to support their campaigns because they only accept the gifts as long as there are no strings attached to them — because those would more correctly be called bribes. Your lack of moral fortitude should not be projected on the rest of the world.

    And you have still failed to provide any evidence that “strong and competent leaders” only accept up to the amount that you have deemed is acceptable! Yet you still make ridiculously ignorant claims like:

    And yet we have been waiting for decades for the Deathocrats to get the big money out of our political process which is the main reason that our government is unable to properly deal the the pandemic now.

    Yet, you never can share how that statement is not just gibberish? Oh, and to your argument that one demand id different and no candidate has ever run small donation only campaigns in the past... lots have! Lots of candidates never received donations over $100 to their campaigns....they were called the “losers” who no one supported.

  103. [103] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Great. You gotta a tune to go along with that, Russ? :(

  104. [104] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Maybe Kick could come up with one for you ...

  105. [105] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    I'm too busy to look right now. Geesh.

  106. [106] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    So, the sixties were a real hoot. I would have had a lot of fun if I'd been aware. :)

    But, I do like the Four Tops ...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkKJy4UaPHM

  107. [107] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    I'd never heard that before, but we're the same age and I liked the Replacements, Soundgarden, and the Offspring better than the bands from my teenage years.

  108. [108] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    Have you ever seen that Coen Bros' movie Blood Simple? That Four Tops song always makes me think of it.

  109. [109] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    And, let's not forget the Ikettes!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S1Cm3cezU_0

    From the Ike and Tina Turner Review!

  110. [110] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    And, speaking of the Four Tops and the Ikettes, how about these lyrics,

    American Music, you can hear it all over the world;
    Right now, somewhere, this minute there's a radio playin on; and it's playin' that Rhythm and Blues; hot dresses and high heeled shoes; with the Ikettes kickin' and the Four Tops singin' that Same Old Song.

    You had to know that PRiSM was comin' sooner and later! Heh.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0hgkFjisCqM

  111. [111] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    I missed Blood Simple - guess I'll have to check it out. I loved loved loved Fargo.

  112. [112] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    I'll skip my favourite quote, given the, ah, circumstances around here, of late. :)

  113. [113] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Don, don't even think about it!

    Replying to [102] I mean. Well, not tonight, anyways.

  114. [114] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    Blood Simple was their first film and it was a good one. Frances McDormand was in it. I actually quoted from it here less than a week ago.

  115. [115] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    Now, in Russia, they got it mapped out so that everyone pulls for everyone else... that's the theory, anyway. But what I know about is Texas, and down here... you're on your own. - Loren Visser

  116. [116] 
    MyVoice wrote:

    A party ain't a party until Linda Ronstadt sings. Hard to pick just one from this 1977 concert in Atlanta, but I'm going with Someone To Lay Down Beside Me

  117. [117] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    A party ain't a party until Linda Ronstadt sings.

    Absolutely, positively, unequivocally!!!

  118. [118] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:
  119. [119] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Who can sing a Stones song? Linda can!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBg5cnoNyAE

  120. [120] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    And, she does a pretty mean Eagles tune, too!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MepxVNU24rM

    Desperado ...

  121. [121] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    MyVoice,

    You weren't actually at that concert in Atlanta, were you!?

  122. [122] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    There's always time for to play a Wicked Game!

  123. [123] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    But, my all-time favourite Linda Ronstadt song is the one that tops this list, Blue Bayou ...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDOujdDWXuo

  124. [124] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    ...while we play...in the Andelman's Yard.

  125. [125] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Oh, Chris Issak. I almost forgot about him. Wicked Game is one of the best music videos, of all time! :)

  126. [126] 
    Kick wrote:

    Elizabeth Miller
    104

    Maybe Kick could come up with one for you ...

    Yes, I could. The song that matches what Russ said:

    Shania Twain - That Don't Impress Me Much (Official Music Video)

  127. [127] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    That's a great song, Kick. We love our Shania!

  128. [128] 
    goode trickle wrote:

    In theory 1978 was supposed to be the focus of today, or so I think.

    Here was what I was up to...

  129. [129] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    MtnCaddy,

    I never heard of Mike Gordon but those are some fun lyrics, getting away from it all, leaving it all behind, for a while ...

  130. [130] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Hey goode trikle!

    I was wondering if anyone would remember that. Well, the night is still young!

    Here's one of my favourites from 1978. Which was such a great year for songs! Then I'll take a listen to yours ...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UrmFLfnWp4w

    Really nice lyrics ...

  131. [131] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    So, GT, which one was you?

  132. [132] 
    Kick wrote:

    Elizabeth Miller
    94

    You're always in the mood for stoner tunes! Heh.

    Yep! :)

  133. [133] 
    goode trickle wrote:

    It was also this while hopped up on Lucky Charms or Corn Pops, and of course any of the Captain Crunch line of cereals... They might have also been mixed altogether for the ultimate tooth rotting super quick sugar high.

  134. [134] 
    Kick wrote:

    I'm playin' catch up, and y'all are trippin' tonight! :)

  135. [135] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Here is a favourite version of the 1978 Styx song, Come Sail Away ...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Do5rStVLGeQ

    Gowan joined Styx in 1999 after a celebrated solo career and, here, it's just like he's always been Styx.

  136. [136] 
    MyVoice wrote:

    [121] Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    You weren't actually at that concert in Atlanta, were you!?

    I wish.

  137. [137] 
    goode trickle wrote:

    Kick- [134]

    So totally not... It's been at least 20 or so years. Thats right about when they stopped putting the stuff in the stuff...

    However, I might be guilty of a couple of Sapphire w/ Elderflower tonic water and a splash of Saint Germain, Lemon seltzer, and garden fresh cucumber peel, garden fresh chopped mint; Served over crushed ice in a highball.

  138. [138] 
    Kick wrote:

    Okay, I'm submitting my song from the 60s.
    Brian Wilson is a musical genius so:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWPo5SC3zik

  139. [139] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Okay, I'm submitting a concert that you are going to feel like you're actually at!

    It's Styx with Gowan but, you can call him Larry ...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1WHjH4UgVrM

  140. [140] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    August 2nd, 2020 at 18:31 UTC ]
    [129]

    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    MtnCaddy,

    I never heard of Mike Gordon but those are some fun lyrics, getting away from it all, leaving it all behind, for a while ...

    Mike Gordon is the bassist for Phish.

  141. [141] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Some of the greatest things about the sixties were Brian Wilson and the Beach Boys!

  142. [142] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    I'm playin' catch up, and y'all are trippin' tonight! :)

    I thought so, too! :-)

  143. [143] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    goode trickle,

    However, I might be guilty of a couple of Sapphire w/ Elderflower tonic water and a splash of Saint Germain, Lemon seltzer, and garden fresh cucumber peel, garden fresh chopped mint; Served over crushed ice in a highball.

    You may go ahead and make mine a double. :)

  144. [144] 
    Kick wrote:

    goode trickle
    137

    Heh.

    However, I might be guilty of a couple of Sapphire w/ Elderflower tonic water and a splash of Saint Germain, Lemon seltzer, and garden fresh cucumber peel, garden fresh chopped mint; Served over crushed ice in a highball.

    Sounds like a "Sparkling Shamrock." :)

  145. [145] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    JFC,

    I prefer my Soul Asylum unplugged ...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_J0rvMq7uto

  146. [146] 
    Kick wrote:

    MtnCaddy

    Okay... I did promise you a song for a bass player.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eeqGuaAl6Ic

    Metallica

  147. [147] 
    goode trickle wrote:

    Kick [144]

    Sounds like a "Sparkling Shamrock"

    Could be, it is kind of a regional/seasonal thing. The original inspiration called for lemonade in place of the seltzer water, but since I was on a ruck to get back to fighting trim I opted for the lemon seltzer.
    I found that I like the less sweet version and my physique likes the lack of sugar.

  148. [148] 
    goode trickle wrote:

    EM-
    You may go ahead and make mine a double. :)

    I would but I am not in the vicinity of Torahknow (please forgive my west coast Canadian, my S.I.N. begins with the dreaded 9).

    The next time I am in your neck of the woods I might see if you want to try one...

  149. [149] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Whatever happened to the bartender around here, anyways??

    Too bad about your SIN but, the west coast is good!

  150. [150] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Okay, let's pick up the beat a bit with my favourite Billy Ocean tune ...

    I first heard it while driving around the Hawai'ian Islands - it didn't matter which island, this song kept being played on the radio.

    Wrong ocean but, what're gonna do.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aa0eBa6wifo

  151. [151] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    And, then, I will have to call it a night with a little Santana w/ Rob Thomas ... real smooth.

    Hope everyone had a lot of fun tonight!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Whgn_iE5uc

  152. [152] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    And, the party continues ... I'm checking back in the morning.

  153. [153] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    [146]

    Why, thank you, Ma'am!

  154. [154] 
    nypoet22 wrote:

    if you're happy and you know it, bang your head!

    https://youtu.be/5aPpvTFfOJE

  155. [155] 
    MyVoice wrote:

    Listening to Carlos Santana own that guitar made me want to hear another string master. Béla Fleck was touring in 1979, but I chose The Sinister Minister from 1990 instead, because I wanted to hear it right now. Love them Flecktones.

  156. [156] 
    Chris Weigant wrote:

    Apropos of absolutely nothing...

    Times like these, I tend to want to retreat into proto-syntho-pop. This was at least a decade or two before others ventured into this territory (except maybe Mike Oldfield, but that's a whole different subject...).

    For anyone who has never experienced it, here's Tangerine Dream's Tangram:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQpAJUZeIAY

    I know, I know, I'm swimming against the tide here, but it still soothes me.

    My musical tastes are, shall we say, rather eclectic... ranging from Jimi Hendrix to all sorts of weird things...

    :-)

    The deeper we get into the coronavirus, the more I keep thinking of the Yes lyric:

    Death defying, mutilated armies gather near.
    Crawling out of dirty holes, their morals, their morals disappear.

    You can see why, obviously...

    -CW

  157. [157] 
    Chris Weigant wrote:

    PS. If you get bored, fast-forward to about 25 minutes in, it gets a lot more interesting then...

    Or if you're really impatient, click on 32 minutes in, that's where it really starts to get interesting.

    And please remember, they were doing this sort of thing YEARS before anyone else...

    :-)

    Edgar Froese rocks.

    -CW

  158. [158] 
    Chris Weigant wrote:

    OK, I can't just let it go.

    Here's the most awesome thing they ever did -- from the soundtrack to "Thief," here is "Igneous":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Npi_hw4NHY

    Enjoy. Crank it up. It's best on a superb speaker system powered by a monstrous stereo system. If it doesn't make you nervous and downright skittish, it's just not loud enough....

    :-)

    -CW

  159. [159] 
    Kick wrote:

    nypoet22
    154

    if you're happy and you know it, bang your head!

    OMG! This is too awesome... that drum kit... that little headbanger :)

  160. [160] 
    Kick wrote:

    Chris Weigant
    156

    For anyone who has never experienced it, here's Tangerine Dream's Tangram:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQpAJUZeIAY

    Okay, about halfway through... dead silence. Ah, is this the intermission? ;)

    Yes, this is musical art... sounds to post by.

    My musical tastes are, shall we say, rather eclectic... ranging from Jimi Hendrix to all sorts of weird things...

    Weird is good. :)

  161. [161] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    Listen (102)-
    "Why not?"
    Because the candidate would be beholden to the contributor.

    Yes I would turn down the 10,000 dollars.

    In fact, I have turned down contributions that exceeded the limit. That's called integrity.

    The whole point of the limit is that it eliminates the need to worry about the intentions of the contributor because no one can give more than 200 dollars.

    Once again you change what I said to fit your argument. I did not say no one has ever run a small donor only campaign, I said no big money candidate has ever been a strong and competent leader.

    One reason the small donor only candidates lost is they did not have an organization behind them.

    The only time that a big money candidate even thinks about going against the big money interests that finance their campaigns is when they think it might cost them too many votes.

    The basic principle of democracy and One Demand.

  162. [162] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    Just in case nobody has noticed, I've referred to Bunker Boy as our Tangerine Nightmare on several occasions.

  163. [163] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    That is very much allowed, you know.

  164. [164] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Chris,

    My musical tastes are, shall we say, rather eclectic... ranging from Jimi Hendrix to all sorts of weird things...

    You'll fit in quite nicely around here, then.I believe Jimi Hendrix came up last night. Where were you? :)

    Don't be such a stranger.

    I b

  165. [165] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Enjoy. Crank it up. It's best on a superb speaker system powered by a monstrous stereo system. If it doesn't make you nervous and downright skittish, it's just not loud enough....

    Right. So, where do you live and are there any neighbours about?

  166. [166] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    I don't know what I b means ... ?

  167. [167] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    I think I know what happened there. :)

  168. [168] 
    TheStig wrote:

    CW-156 etc, Kick &
    JFC

    Piped the Tangerine links this AM thru my vintage stereo monitors and was not disappointed. I vaguely remember watching the movie in a actual theater back in the early 80s - which is when I had the monitors built.

    The World has gone MP3 - but it just doesn't that good to my ear.

    Anybody seen Ex-Machina? I think it's still on NetFlix. Sound track is very TD-esque. One of the better low budget Sci-Fi movies ever made IMHO.

    Might as well recommend Tales of the Loop from Amazon Prime. Only 6 episodes, I hope they make more.

  169. [169] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Will a mega-watt stereo do? It works just fine for a 12-bar shuffle ...

  170. [170] 
    Kick wrote:

    Don Harris
    161

    <i?Once again you change what I said to fit your argument. I did not say no one has ever run a small donor only campaign, I said no big money candidate has ever been a strong and competent leader.

    No, he didn't change what you said, and after all these years, you still haven't answered a boatload of questions along the same lines. Your insistence that anyone who would take a donation larger than your mandated $200 amount is an elementary asinine purity test signifying nothing.

    A strong and competent leader would not take big money to run their campaign. ~ Don Harris

    *
    Prove it. Your equating of "big money" with evildoers is tedium ad nauseam and something for which you've yet to provide any proof despite multiple requests to do so. Your standard answer is claiming that someone twisted your words when no one has done that. As so many others have said and Russ is saying again:

    And you have still failed to provide any evidence that “strong and competent leaders” only accept up to the amount that you have deemed is acceptable! ~ Russ

    You've claim repeatedly that those who would accept more than your mandate aren't worthy, strong, competent, etc. Prove it. I could set my own arbitrary purity test and claim that those candidates who don't say 25 "Hail Mary's" a day aren't "strong and competent" leaders because I said so. I mean, if they're not willing to hit their knees and do the praying, they cannot possibly be worthy to lead. It sounds stupid because it is. Your standard operational statements sound likewise.

    One reason the small donor only candidates lost is they did not have an organization behind them. ~ Don Harris

    Okay then. Please name the small donor only candidates and prove they didn't have an "organization behind them." I'll wait. The other reason the small donor only candidates lost is because they did not hit their knees and say those 25 Hail Mary's a day. It sounds stupid because it is.

    The only time that a big money candidate even thinks about going against the big money interests that finance their campaigns is when they think it might cost them too many votes.

    I don't know a candidate that doesn't meet your definition of "big money candidate." Please explain how it is that you believe you know what they all think. It sounds asinine because it is. You have no idea what a "big money candidate" thinks, and I know this because you haven't hit your knees and said the magic 25 Hail Mary's... I just know you're an "evildoer" because I just know.

    The basic principle of democracy and One Demand.

    The basic principle isn't a principle at all. You have decided who is worthy based on your arbitrary condition. I have decided anyone who doesn't hit their knees and perform the 25 Hail Mary's is doomed to failure, and I know you're not doing them because you're failing.

    Stupid is as stupid does... or in this case doesn't do. .. derp, derp. *give me a damn break*

  171. [171] 
    nypoet22 wrote:

    re: talking point 6

    i wonder if it would make sense to have some watchdog activity specifically targeting and reporting on digital manipulation, be it photos, speeches, or whatever else. digitally altering an opponent's sound, appearance, and even fabricating statements they never made, seems to be a burgeoning field in propaganda.

    JL

  172. [172] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    Kick(171)-
    Childish trolling.

    If you choose to make an adult argument worthy of a response I may choose to respond.

  173. [173] 
    Kick wrote:

    Don Harris
    172

    Childish trolling.

    You can't address the issues.

    If you choose to make an adult argument worthy of a response I may choose to respond.

    You just did respond. *laughs*

  174. [174] 
    Kick wrote:

    Don Harris
    172

    If you choose to make an adult argument worthy of a response I may choose to respond.

    Did it ever occur to you that your statement above is an apt description for the response you're receiving regarding "your idea" that isn't really your idea? If it hasn't, it should have.

  175. [175] 
    Kick wrote:

    Surprise not surprise

    NY prosecutors say Trump investigation extends beyond hush money payments

    Manhattan prosecutors on Monday asked a federal judge to dismiss President Donald Trump's lawsuit challenging a subpoena for his financial records, arguing that the claims have already been rejected by other courts, while emphasizing that their investigation extends beyond hush-money payments.

    Last week, lawyers for Trump filed an amended complaint seeking to block the state grand jury subpoena to Trump's long-time accountant Mazars USA for eight years of personal and business records by arguing the subpoena was "wildly overbroad" and issued in bad faith.

    Trump's latest legal challenge comes after the US Supreme Court ruled last month that the President does not have broad immunity from a state grand jury subpoena.

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/03/politics/trump-new-york-vance-investigation/index.html

    Winning!

    Even with the two dissents, the SCOTUS was in unanimous agreement 9-0 regarding the issue that Trump must comply with the criminal process; however, the high court reiterated the president is entitled to pursue procedural challenges that are afforded to any citizen of the United States (not a surprise, he always could). For the average citizen, issues are generally worked out in good faith through Courts. For an operator like Trump who uses the legal process as their own personal tool in order to obfuscate and delay justice -- the tactics of Roy Cohn -- that could mean additional delay of months or even years in the criminal investigation by the Manhattan prosecutors into whether Trump has committed criminal tax fraud. As per Trump's standard modus operandi, his legal team will use whatever means necessary that is at their their disposal to tie the issue up in the Courts for years... indeed, as they've already been doing, using the office of the presidency as a means to tie it up even further knowing full well that the SCOTUS has never in its history made a ruling that placed a president above the law in either civil or criminal issues. The SCOTUS wouldn't even entertain such a request from Joe Average Citizen so Trump is yet again using the office of the presidency as a shield to avoid personal responsibility, and he'll continue to do so as long as he's in office.

    The prosecutors in New York already have Donald Trump's federal tax return information since the IRS and the states already share information freely back and forth. What they've been trying to obtain (and Trump is trying to delay) are Trump Organization business records, accounting records at Mazars and the financial records from Deutsche Bank back to 2011. Once eventually acquired (after intended delays via Court, of course), if those business documents do not support the tax returns as filed, you have criminal tax fraud. This ain't rocket science. It's simple math.

    Donald Trump has already faced two tax fraud cases in civil court regarding his 1984 tax return. He lost both of those civil tax fraud trials. He had no evidence for massive tax deductions he had taken in 1984. Trump had just fabricated a claim with no documentation for massive deductions.

    This case at issue before the Court now is criminal tax fraud involving a Grand Jury, and based on reporting in The New York Times where they obtained the tax records of the Trumps in regards to the issue of Fred Trump's estate (wherein his neice provided the tax returns), who knows what lies ahead for the Trump money laundering tax evading criminal cabal? Somebody in New York knows, that's who.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Start spreading the news
    I'm leaving today
    I want to be a part of it
    New York, New York...
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    So to recap: Trump is screwed, and he knows it. There's not a dang thing Trump can do to wangle out of this tax case now that SCOTUS has ruled he has to give over his tax records. Trump will eventually either come to an agreement with prosecutors or be indicted for criminal tax fraud. His tax records aren't going to match his tax returns or he would have already supplied them.

  176. [176] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    [156]


    Death defying, mutilated armies gather near.
    Crawling out of dirty holes, their morals, their morals disappear.

    Yes, indeed!

    No, literally.

  177. [177] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    As a member of Grave Dancers Union Local 420, I would like to propose that we all get some practice. How about we all choose some songs for The Donald for next Sunday? We can't let the Lincoln Project have all the fun.

  178. [178] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    [170]

    Kick, that's as thorough a summary of OD's problems ass I've yet to see.

    [172]

    Don Harris wrote:

    Kick(171)-


    Childish trolling.

    If you choose to make an adult argument worthy of a response I may choose to respond.

    No, Don that was NOT childish trolling. Kick just blew away your Messianic One Demand. The only thing I would have added to her comment is the question that you've yet to answer, namely, what about the ocean of PAC money out there? Corporate money, "dark" money and (possibly/likely in Trump's case?)

    Don you've failed to address these points. That's too bad because I think most of your fellow Weigantians want big money out of politics. If you cannot up your game to persuade this Libtard** audience, how are you going to make any headway with the rest of the electorate?

    **Libtard? I have a couple of Trumpanzie buddies and I tell them that I'm a "Loud and Proud Libtard."

    I do this because while it may seem self-depreciating,

    (1) It gets them to laugh and thence their defenses lower enough to have a political discussion that doesn't end up in fisticuffs.

    (2) I'm grown up enough that I know that no one can make me feel bad about myself except ME (OK, maybe Kick, if I ever get on her bad side.)

    (3) I'm not the genius who's been voting against my own wallet (and environment and religious freedom -- as in freedom from other people's religious beliefs -- e.g. abortion) since effing Saint Ronnie.


    I know who the "tard" is when I talk to Republicans.

  179. [179] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    ...ass I've yet to see? *Yikes -- no disrespect intended, Kick*

  180. [180] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    Must.

    Proofread.

    Better.

    178 reposted for clarity:

    [170]

    Kick, that's as thorough a summary of OD's problems ass I've yet to see.

    [172]

    Don Harris wrote:


    Kick(171)-

    Childish trolling.

    If you choose to make an adult argument worthy of a response I may choose to respond.</I

    No, Don that was NOT childish trolling. Kick just blew away your Messianic One Demand. The only thing I would have added to her comment is the question that you've yet to answer, namely, what about the ocean of PAC money out there? Corporate money, "dark" money and (possibly/likely in Trump's case) foreign money?

    Don you've failed to address these points. That's too bad because I think most of your fellow Weigantians want big money out of politics.

    If you cannot up your game to persuade this Libtard** audience, how are you going to make any headway with the rest of the electorate?

    **Libtard? I have a couple of Trumpanzie buddies and I tell them that I'm a "Loud and Proud Libtard."

    I do this because while it may seem self-depreciating,

    (1) It gets them to laugh and thence their defenses lower enough to have a political discussion that doesn't end up in fisticuffs.

    (2) I'm grown up enough that I know that no one can make me feel bad about myself except ME (OK, maybe Kick, if I ever get on her bad side!)

    (3) I'm not the genius who's been voting against my own wallet (and my own environment and my own religious freedom -- as in freedom from other people's religious beliefs -- e.g. abortion) since effing Saint Ronnie.


    I know who the "tard" is when I talk to Republicans.

  181. [181] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    Mtn Caddy-
    Yes I have answered all of that. Many times.

    That is why it is childish trolling. Kick (and you) are claiming I never did things I have done and are just using reset comments and demands for proof already provided or ridiculous to expect because you have no rational adult argument.

  182. [182] 
    Don Harris wrote:

    Kick has a good side?

  183. [183] 
    ListenWhenYouHear wrote:

    Don Harris,

    "Why not?"
    Because the candidate would be beholden to the contributor.

    Says who? Why does someone become beholden to a gift of $300 when they weren’t when they got a gift of $200?

    I love that you proudly admit that you are unable to accept a gift without feeling like you have to do something in return as if that is something to be proud of! Really???
    That’s like bragging about castrating yourself because you couldn’t walk past a tree with a knothole without sticking your dick in it. The fact that you cannot resist the urge to do what you shouldn’t does not make you sound trustworthy. Why would I vote for a candidate who only takes small donations because they cannot be trusted not to prostitute their office is they accept larger donations? That is what you are selling, BTW.

    Plus, you debunked your own argument a few sentences down when you say:

    The only time that a big money candidate even thinks about going against the big money interests that finance their campaigns is when they think it might cost them too many votes.

    A politician won’t vote to pass legislation that they know will cost them votes in the next election. Isn’t that how we expect it to work with politicians — they vote the way their constituents want or they lose their support????

  184. [184] 
    ListenWhenYouHear wrote:

    Kick [170]

    I should’ve looked further down to your response to DH before bothering to write my reply! You dropped the mic with that one! BOOM! Thanks for the assist! So glad that you know what point I am trying to make and can word it in even clearer terms.

    Don’s “You’re trolling me!” reply is the new “I have already answered that,” fan favorite of his that is just as false, but at least gives him a little variety.

  185. [185] 
    Kick wrote:

    Don Harris
    181

    Yes I have answered all of that. Many times.

    No, you haven't; you never have.

    That is why it is childish trolling. Kick (and you) are claiming I never did things I have done and are just using reset comments and demands for proof already provided or ridiculous to expect because you have no rational adult argument.

    I made a rational argument. I say a candidate can earn my vote by hitting their knees and saying 25 Hail Mary's a day. If you think that's irrational, then your on the right track to understanding exactly how you sound on a repetitive basis on a permanent loop that's gone on for 5 years. You should know that it gets worse with age, and I should think you'd understand by now that your wish isn't anyone's command.

  186. [186] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    She's right Don. When I've posed difficult questions you've disappeared without addressing my points.


    Now is your chance to not disappear but instead address Kick's 170 and my 180. If you don't we know not to take you seriously

  187. [187] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    Here's a look at How the Pandemic Defeated America, from The Atlantic.


    How did it come to this? A virus a thousand times smaller than a dust mote has humbled and humiliated the planet’s most powerful nation. America has failed to protect its people, leaving them with illness and financial ruin. It has lost its status as a global leader. It has careened between inaction and ineptitude. The breadth and magnitude of its errors are difficult, in the moment, to truly fathom.

  188. [188] 
    Kick wrote:

    MtnCaddy
    178

    Kick, that's as thorough a summary of OD's problems ass I've yet to see.

    I claim ownership to being an "ass," but in my defense, I'm not a big fan of trolling trolls who troll. I am not calling anyone a name, just explaining what behavior turns me into a veritable "ass."

    The only thing I would have added to her comment is the question that you've yet to answer, namely, what about the ocean of PAC money out there? Corporate money, "dark" money and (possibly/likely in Trump's case?)

    Excellent point. Perhaps Don's plan is exactly like the Trumpian coronavirus plan in that, quote: "One day, it's like a miracle, it will disappear." At least we'd then have an answer even if it was mindless and nonsensical.

    Don you've failed to address these points. That's too bad because I think most of your fellow Weigantians want big money out of politics. If you cannot up your game to persuade this Libtard** audience, how are you going to make any headway with the rest of the electorate?

    I can answer this one for him: He isn't.

    **Libtard? I have a couple of Trumpanzie buddies and I tell them that I'm a "Loud and Proud Libtard."

    I do this because while it may seem self-depreciating,

    (1) It gets them to laugh and thence their defenses lower enough to have a political discussion that doesn't end up in fisticuffs.

    (2) I'm grown up enough that I know that no one can make me feel bad about myself except ME (OK, maybe Kick, if I ever get on her bad side.)

    Okay, two things:

    * It's intelligent to own the name, particularly when it's supposed to be an insult and you can own it while owning your opponent. Best example I have of this phenomenon is the GOP referring to the Affordable Care Act as "Obamacare," which was designed to insult him and the plan. So Barack Obama says (paraphrasing): I'm proud of that because Obama does care. Argument over... hoisted by their own petard.

    * I have multiple sides, and none of them are "bad" per se. Naughty? Guilty as charged. Bad? Well... define "bad." ;)

  189. [189] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    JFC,

    As a member of Grave Dancers Union Local 420, I would like to propose that we all get some practice. How about we all choose some songs for The Donald for next Sunday? We can't let the Lincoln Project have all the fun.

    Done!

  190. [190] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    I'm guessing you've got some choice tunes already lined up, Hello?

  191. [191] 
    Kick wrote:

    Don Harris
    182

    Kick has a good side?

    I have multiple good sides. For instance, one of my good sides contributes to multiple worthy causes and political candidates and things I believe in. After about a week of reading your repetitive comments on this blog, I vowed right then and there that I would never again contribute less than $201 to a politician or a worthy cause ever again... and I haven't.

    Recently, I reached into my pocket and volunteered to pay for lunch for a group of hard-working volunteers. I do that a lot because I believe people that work hard deserve to be kept happy. I asked them how much they thought would cover it, and I kid you not, they said $200 ought to cover it. I made them take $220. I got my principles, you know. :)

  192. [192] 
    goode trickle wrote:

    Don is incapable of answering those hard questions, always has been, always will be.

    Which is in keeping with my expectations for someone whose website has been undergoing the longest update in history assuming of course he manages to keep it up and running.

    If I was trying to start a movement I certainly would be doing some leg work to get some buzz external to my myopic need to have someone else write about it.

    I would probably also analyze if my messaging was effective if my moveon.org petition only managed to net 16 signatures...Just saying.

  193. [193] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    Is the news so bad for Trump and the Repugs that our other troll has "left the building?" I get it, I wouldn't wanna be him come November, as the Repugs are going to get tsunamied this time around.

    Or did he get a yellow or red card? Don is simply boring and I thought other troll should have gotten the card instead. Whaddup, CW?

  194. [194] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    Funny how so much ink is being spilled over someone y'all don't take seriously. Heh.

  195. [195] 
    Kick wrote:

    ListenWhenYouHear
    183

    Says who? Why does someone become beholden to a gift of $300 when they weren’t when they got a gift of $200?

    They don't!

    I love that you proudly admit that you are unable to accept a gift without feeling like you have to do something in return as if that is something to be proud of! Really???

    This! Russ is absolutely correct; this is ridiculous.

    That’s like bragging about castrating yourself because you couldn’t walk past a tree with a knothole without sticking your dick in it.

    Okay, I'm a visual person, and that's a picture that's going to linger. Just FYI, I pictured Don's as small because... you know... small mind, small...

    The fact that you cannot resist the urge to do what you shouldn’t does not make you sound trustworthy. Why would I vote for a candidate who only takes small donations because they cannot be trusted not to prostitute their office if they accept larger donations? That is what you are selling, BTW.

    Hey, that is a very good point, Russ. It's like a political candidate taking ownership that he can't be trusted! Boom. Hammer time. Let's say I give $500 to a cause I believe is worthy, and that person sends it back saying they won't accept more than $200, and I know full well that the extra $300 would go a long way to helping cover amounts that others aren't able to send for whatever reason. What do I think about that person? It's not good things, I will say. :)

  196. [196] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    MtnCaddy,

    Thanks for posting that Atlantic article! I'm just a bit through it but can tell it's a must read. More to say about it throughout the week - it's an important piece.

    The good news for countries like the US is that it is not too late to turn the response around and get the virus under control ...

  197. [197] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    LizM,

    I'm guessing you've got some choice tunes already lined up

    Just one, but I believe that ya'all will be impressed with how unusually appropriate it is.

  198. [198] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    I got the idea from [175]. I didn't think of the song first.

  199. [199] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    MtnCaddy [193],

    An exit strategy was needed.
    Provocation escalated until an excuse was provided.
    Rest assured that the poltergeist always returns.
    Enough with the Beetlejuice chants!

  200. [200] 
    Kick wrote:

    MtnCaddy
    187

    Here's a look at How the Pandemic Defeated America, from The Atlantic.

    Wow. That article is a great summary of "how we got here." Sad with so many things preventable.

    When Ebola came to America, we had a competent POTUS and competent leaders of the City of Dallas who listened to the doctors/scientists and took the actions they were given. The doctor heading the response and giving our marching orders? Dr. Anthony Fauci. There was massive contract tracing, massive amounts of quarantining, and it was a crazy time in North Texas. We got our marching orders and followed them to the letter. Can you imagine if we had refused because some con artist politician downplayed the problem and insisted it was a right-wing hoax?

    So to recap: This pandemic didn't have to be this way; Ebola landing in North Texas and the government and citizens' response is the proof. It wasn't going to magically disappear one day, and SARS-CoV-2 isn't either.

  201. [201] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    Funny how so much ink is being spilled over someone y'all don't take seriously.

    I hypothesize that "ya'all" have been encouraged by (the admittedly transient) success of last week's ghostbusting.

  202. [202] 
    Kick wrote:

    Elizabeth Miller
    194

    Funny how so much ink is being spilled over someone y'all don't take seriously. Heh.

    You can take aspects of a person's demeanor and actions seriously without taking their entire message seriously.

    Seriously.

  203. [203] 
    Kick wrote:

    John From Censornati
    198

    I got the idea from [175].

    175? Uh oh.

  204. [204] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    We're gonna dance on his grave.

  205. [205] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    and, in style!

  206. [206] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    But, let's be careful how we tread, though...

  207. [207] 
    Kick wrote:

    John From Censornati
    204

    We're gonna dance on his grave.

    I'll spit on it and maybe bring a shovel. Deal?

  208. [208] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    We will vote.

  209. [209] 
    John From Censornati wrote:
  210. [210] 
    Kick wrote:

    John From Censornati
    208

    We will vote.

    They make it hard to vote in Texas, and we're still going to vote. Nothing will stop us. If I have to wear a giant rubber... suit and N95 mask, I'm voting. :)

  211. [211] 
    John From Censornati wrote:

    For the primary this year, there was one polling place in this county of 750,000+.

  212. [212] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    [207] Kick wrote:


    John From Censornati

    204

    We're gonna dance on his grave.

    I'll spit on it and maybe bring a shovel. Deal?

    That reminds me of a politics related item on my bucket list:

    I've watched Reaganism® trash the American Dream for 40 effing years now. So, I want to go to Reagan's grave and pee on it. I'll probably face arrest unless I'm very clever at it, but that's what I want to do.

  213. [213] 
    MtnCaddy wrote:

    Kick,

    FYI that "ass" was the auto correct version of "as."

    And, from afar, I think You're splendid! Keep, er, kicking ass (I couldn't resist ;P

  214. [214] 
    Kick wrote:

    John From Censornati
    211

    For the primary this year, there was one polling place in this county of 750,000+.

    I heard about that mess in KY, but y'all do get to vote by mail no questions asked. I want to do that, dang it.

    I also heard that there were 13+ percent of Republicans who voted "uncommitted" rather than vote for Trump. Ouch. Trump keeps saying he's popular in the GOP, but the polls that matter keep saying otherwise.

  215. [215] 
    Kick wrote:

    MtnCaddy
    212

    That reminds me of a politics related item on my bucket list:

    I've watched Reaganism® trash the American Dream for 40 effing years now. So, I want to go to Reagan's grave and pee on it. I'll probably face arrest unless I'm very clever at it, but that's what I want to do.

    Okay, I'm talking "spitting" on someone's political grave... not their actual grave. I wish Donald Trump a long life and lots of time either in prison or under house arrest for his crimes against the United States.

    As for that Reagan thing, it won't do you any good since he's buried in a large mahogany casket that is encased by a heavy bronze-lined vault placed 7-feet deep in an underground crypt paved over by solid concrete.

  216. [216] 
    ListenWhenYouHear wrote:

    Liz,

    Funny how so much ink is being spilled over someone y'all don't take seriously. Heh.

    Sure, I know that he is running what can barely be referred to as a “poorly runner scam”, but I am sure that some people might read his rhetoric and unwittingly buy into what he is claiming out of ignorance. As someone who has experience running a non-profit that survived only by the generosity of the communities I worked in, I have a huge problem with scammers who take advantage of the kindness of others. I just like to make sure anyone new to this site is warned about drinking his Koolaid!

    And to be honest, while much of OneDemands’ set up wreaks of being a cash scam (read: his website!!!), Don does not exhibit any of the sociopathic characteristics you’d usually expect from someone running a scam. He is not a charmer. He doesn’t press for money at all. OneDemand is just an idea that sounded good on the surface, but that you realize as soon as you start to go deeper was never fully thought out. So either he truly did not mean for OneDemand to be a scam; or if he did mean for it to be a scam, he is the worst con man to ever grift!

  217. [217] 
    Elizabeth Miller wrote:

    He is not a charmer.

    So, you haven't been invited to his backyard shindig?

    Count yourself among the left out!

    Don is really one of the good guys.

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